Home > False Rape > Bombay HC:- To Protect the character, Women term consensual Sex with someone outside the WEDLOCK as RAPE. Quashed False Rape Case.

Bombay HC:- To Protect the character, Women term consensual Sex with someone outside the WEDLOCK as RAPE. Quashed False Rape Case.

“in the  ordinary  circumstances,  a woman is  not likely  to make  a  false  allegation  of  rape, when  she is  caught  or is suspected of having had sexual intercourse  with someone  outside the wedlock, she is quite likely to try to protect her character, by claiming that what  was done, was without her consent. “

IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUDICATURE AT BOMBAY

 CRIMINAL APPELLATE JURISDICTION

CRIMINAL APPEAL NO.1041 OF 2005

 

YOGESH JANARDHAN SHINDE )

Aged 25 years, Indian Inhabitant, residing at )

Hanuman Nagar, Ulhasnagar No.1. )

Accused is presently lodged in Nasik Road Jail. )…APPELLANT

V/S.

THE STATE OF MAHARASHTRA )

(Through P.S.O. Ulhasnagar Police Station )…RESPONDENT

None for the Appellant.

Ms.R.M.Gadhvi APP for the State.

 

CORAM: A.M.THIPSAY

 

DATE    : 11th APRIL, 2012.

 

ORAL JUDGMENT :

 

The appellant was prosecuted on the allegations of having committed offences  punishable  under Sections 450, 376  and  506 of Indian Penal Code  (IPC).  The Learned  1st Ad­hoc  Additional Sessions Judge , Kalyan , who tried him, found him guilty of offences punishable under Sections 451 and 376 of IPC.  The Learned 1st Ad­hoc Additional Sessions   Judge,   sentenced   the   appellant   to   undergo   Rigorous Imprisonment for six months  and to pay a fine of Rs.500/­, with respect to the offence punishable  under Section 451 of the IPC and  to undergo Rigorous Imprisonment for five years and to pay a fine of Rs.2,000/­, with respect to the offence punishable under Section 376 of IPC.  There was another accused who  was also  prosecuted in the said case along with   the   appellant,   but   the   Learned   1st   Ad­hoc   Additional   Sessions Judge, found him not guilty and acquitted him.  The appellant, being aggrieved by his conviction  and  the  sentences imposed on him,  has approached this court by filing the present appeal.

2 When the appeal came up for hearing, it was revealed that the   appellant   was   released   from   prison   after   having   served   the sentences imposed upon him.   Nevertheless, the  appeal having been admitted, was required to be decided on merits.

3 When   the   appeal   appeared   on   board   for   hearing   on 2.4.2012, nobody appeared  for the appellant.  On 9.4.2012, to which date   the   matter   was   adjourned,   also,   nobody   appeared   for   the appellant.  The matter was then kept on 10.4.2012, when also, nobody appeared   and   then   ultimately,   when   it   appeared   on   board   today, though nobody  appeared for the appellant, it was decided to dispose of the appeal, after hearing Smt. R. M. Gadhvi, the learned APP for the Sate.

4 With the assistance of the learned APP, I have gone through the entire evidence adduced  during trial and perused the record of the case.  I have gone through the  impugned judgment  and order.

5 The   prosecution   case,  as  was  put  forth  before   the   trial court, was in brief as follows :

The victim  (name  not mentioned  to  avoid  disclosure  of identity) is a married woman.  She used  to reside at Ulhas Nagar with her  husband, in  front  of  the  house  of  one  Smt. Rambha-devi  (PW1). The appellant and  the other accused were also residing in  the same locality  and  near  the  room, where  the victim was  residing with her husband. That on 2.6.1999, in the night, the victim was sleeping in her room.  Her husband was  also  sleeping in the room.  That at about 2.00 a.m., the appellant entered  in her room.  He caught the victim and pressed her mouth.  Thereafter, the appellant and the original accused no.2 Raju, lifted her and took her out of the house.   The victim was taken   to  the  back  side  of  her  house,  where  she  was  raped  by  the appellant.  The victim started weeping and returned to her room, after the act was over.  The appellant and the other accused had already run away towards their respective houses.  The victim informed whatever had happened  to her husband.    It is  thereafter,  that  the matter was reported to the police, in the morning.   The statement of the victim was treated as First Information Report (FIR) (Exhibit 45),  on the  basis of which investigation commenced.  The appellant and the other accused came to be arrested and prosecuted as aforesaid.

6 The prosecution examined seven witnesses during the trial. The first witness is Smt. Rambha-devi, neighbour of the appellant as well as  the victim.   The  second witness is  the victim  her-self .  The  third witness Satish Chandra is a panch, in respect of the arrest panchnama (Exh 47) , but he did not support the case of the prosecution and was   declared   hostile.     His   evidence   is   of   no   assistance   to   the prosecution.     The   fourth   witness,   Dr.Sunita,   is   the   one   who   had examined   the   victim   on   2.6.1999.     The   fifth   witness   Shaligram Sonawane is a panch in respect of the panchnama (Exhibit 55), which relates   to   the   recovery   of   a   knife   (Article   12),   pursuant   to   the information   disclosed   by   the   appellant.     The   sixth   witness   witness Dr.Rajan Pore is the Medical Officer , who had examined  the appellant on 2.6.1999.  The seventh witness Mallikarjun Hajare, Sub Inspector of Police, attached   to Ulhas Nagar Police Station at the material time, is the Investigating Officer.

7 It is clear that the case of the prosecution basically rests on the testimony of the victim.   Her  husband, though a witness, was not examined, during the trial.

8 Before considering the testimony of the victim, the other evidence adduced against the  appellant, may be discussed in brief :  Smt. Rambhadevi (PW1) was expected to say that she had seen  the  appellant having  a  knife  and entering in  the house  of  the victim, with the other accused present  outside the house. She was also expected  to  say  that  the  appellant  had  taken  the victim  out  of  her house.   However, Smt. Rambhadevi did not support  the case of  the prosecution.  She was declared hostile and the APP’s efforts, to secure some evidence in favor of the  prosecution from  her by putting leading questions to her, have not been successful.

9 The evidence of Dr.Sunita (PW4) shows that an abrasion(scratch) on ‘right iliac crest’  measuring 3 cm. x 2 cm. was found on the body of the victim.  No other injuries on her body  were noticed.  This witness was unable to give an opinion that the victim had been subjected to  any forcible sexual intercourse.

10 The evidence of Shaligram Sonawane (PW5) shows that on 6.6.1999, he had been to Ulhas  Nagar Police Station, for his own work, when ‘Hazare Saheb’ (PW7) called him and showed him  two persons, one of whom was  the  appellant  and  asked him, whether  they were from his  Ward. This witness claimed that he knew the appellant.  He then states that there were some writings made at  the Police station and  that the appellant disclosed  certain information to  P.S.I. Hazare, pursuant to which,  the police and the panchas were led to the house of the   appellant,   from   where   a   knife   was   recovered.     In   the   cross examination, he  admitted  that he had no talk with the appellant at that time, in the police station.   He also admitted  that the appellant did not talk anything to any Police Officer or policeman.  He also admitted that the Memorandum Panchnama (Exhibit 54) had already been written, when he went to the  Police station.  He also admitted that he did not go with the appellant on the back side of his  house, from where the knife was supposedly recovered.

11 In his evidence, Dr.Rajan (PW6) said that on examination of the appellant, he did not find  any external injuries on his body.  He found the appellant capable of performing  sexual  intercourse.

12 The evidence of P.S.I. Hazare (PW7) speaks about all steps taken by him during investigat-ion. It shows  that  the appellant was arrested on 2.6.1999 itself.   P.S.I. Hazare also states about seizure of certain incriminating articles and of sending  them  to  the Director of Forensic  Science  Laboratory, Mumbai,  for  analysis  and  opinion.   He speaks  about the seizure of the knife on 6.6.1999.

13 Thus,  the evidence makes he  following clear.   First,  that except a scratch,  the victim had not sustained any injuries, whatsoever. Secondly, even the appellant had not sustained any injuries, whatsoever.

14 The evidence of  the victim/prosecutrix may now be examined. According to the prosecutrix, the appellant had entered inside her room at 2.00 a.m., when her husband  was also sleeping in  the  said room; and that, the appellant had caught her, pressed her mouth, lifted her with the help  of the other  accused and had taken her out of the room. Then,  she  was  taken  to  the  backside  of  her  house, where  she  was raped.    In  her  evidence,  she  did  not make  any mention  about  the appellant having a knife with him, or having threatened her by using a knife.  From this, the recovery of the knife, allegedly at the instance of the appellant, is rendered meaningless.  It may, however, be observed, that even otherwise the evidence  in that regard cannot be considered as satisfactory.

15 In  the cross examination, it was brought  on  record  that certain   matters   spoken   about   her   in   her   evidence,   had   not   been mentioned by her in the FIR (Exh 45).   However, it is  unnecessary to discuss those aspects.  What needs to be discussed is the probability of the vers- ion of the victim/prosecutrix being  true and in  that context, certain admissions elicited from  her in the cross examination, need to be kept in mind.

16 The victim admitted in the cross examination that at the material time, she and her  husband had slept on a ‘khat’ in the house. Though she denied the  suggestion, that her evide-nce  that the appellant and the other accused had lifted her and taken her out of the house was false,  the  fact remains, that it would be extremely difficult  to accept that the victim could be  taken away forcibly from her room, when her husband was sleeping besides her.   In the cross  examination, the victim said that the appellant made her sleep on the ground and also admitted that there were stones at the place of occurrence.  If this would be so, then the prosecutrix  was  expected to have, atleast some more scratches on her person.  But, as aforesaid,  the medical evidence does not show the presence of any injuries, except a scratch on right iliac crest.

17 The victim also admitted in the cross examination that when she returned back to her  house,  her husband was standing and waiting for her at the  house.  She also admitted  that as seen as she saw her husband, she started weeping.  She also admitted that she wept for the first time at the time of the incident, on seeing her husband.  She also  admitted  that  one  could  hear  the  shouts made  at  the  place  of occurrence, at her house.  She also admitted that there were other houses,  adjoining her house, and there were hutments adjoining the place of  occurrence  and  that people were residing in  those hutments. It also becomes clear from the cross examination that the victim knows the appellant very well,  in as much as, she has said that the appellant was, at the material time,  residing in his house  along with his parents, brothers and sisters.

18 Considering the entire evidence, though it is not possible to hold that nothing had happened  in the night in question and that the victim has invented a false and got up story,  the  possibility  of the victim being a consenting party to the act of sexual intercourse, which might have taken  place between the appellant and her, cannot be overlooked.The story put forth by the victim is  improbable in several respects.  First of all, it is difficult to accept that the  victim could be picked up against her wish, while she was sleeping by the side of her husband on a khat. It is difficult to imagine that someone would dare to enter the room in which the  victim was  sleeping with her husband and would dare to pick her up from the side of her husband and  successfully take her away to a nearby place, which again was surrendered by several hutments with people living there.    The story that because her mouth was pressed, she   could   not shout , cannot be   accepted   easily, as certainly the prosecutrix could have drawn the attention of her husband, when she was   allegedly   being   picked   up   and   certainly   all   the   adjoining neighbours and hutment dwellers, when she was taken to the backside of her house.  It would not be easy for any person to rape a grown up and   married   woman   under   these   circumstances and if the woman would offer resistance.  There are also no marks of any injuries  on the body of the victim, showing any attempt of resistance on her part.

19 The significant aspect of the matter however is, when the victim came home , her husband  was awake and had been waiting for her.    This is an admitted position. The victim naturally  owed an explanation to her husband, as to where she had gone in those night hours, without  informing  him.  Once the victim sensed the likelihood of her husband questioning her on this aspect and  detecting that she had gone out with the appellant or  for the purpose of meeting  him, it was quite natural for her to allege rape, so that the husband might not take her as a  consenting party.

20 Though, in the  ordinary  circumstances,  a woman is  not likely  to make  a  false  allegation  of  rape, when  she is  caught  or is suspected of having had sexual intercourse  with someone  outside the wedlock, she is quite likely to try to protect her character, by claiming that what  was done, was without her consent.   Such a possibility is quite clear in the facts and circumstances of the present case, where the story of the victim when  judged by the  ordinary  yardstick, appears to be quite improbable.

21 Thus, even if it is assumed that sexual intercourse had indeed taken place between the appellant and the victim, as alleged by her, the possibility of the victim  being a  consenting party to the said act, cannot   be   overruled.     Certainly, at least   a   doubt   that   the   sexual intercourse, if   any, between   the   appellant   and   the   victim   was consensual, arises upon a consideration of  the entire evidence.   The appellant was entitled for the benefit of  such  reasonable doubt  and should have been acquitted.   The appreciation of evidence, as done by the trial court, is not proper or legal.  The impugned order therefore needs to be interfered with, in the interest of justice.

 

22 The appeal is allowed.

The impugned judgment and the order of conviction is set  aside.

The appellant stands acquitted.

Fine if paid, to be refunded to him.

The appeal stands disposed of in aforesaid terms.

(A.M.THIPSAY, J.)

 

 

  1. Salim Bootwala
    January 24, 2013 at 11:14 pm

    This is a very fair and just judgment.
    The word of a woman need not be the gospel truth. An innocent man gets some solace thanks to the practical approach of the Hon’ble Judge given the conviction of rape by a lower Court.

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Fight for Justice

A crusaders blog for inspiring thought.

Stand up for your rights

Gender biased laws

MyNation Foundation - News

News Articles from MyNation, india - News you can use

498afighthard's Blog

Raising Awareness About Gender Biased Laws and its misuse In India

The WordPress.com Blog

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.

%d bloggers like this: